Final Public Stargaze: October 5

Graphic: International Observe the Moon Night - October 5, 2019
Save the Night: International Observe the Moon Night, October 5, 2019

The year’s final public stargazing session hosted by the Cuyahoga Astronomical Association (CAA) will take place Saturday, October 5, from 8:00 to 10 p.m. at our Letha House Park West observatory site.

Given good sky conditions visitors will be able to view Jupiter, Saturn, star clusters, and Earth’s Moon. In fact, the date coincides with International Observe the Moon Night: a worldwide appreciation of our world’s nearest neighbor in space.

The event is free, open to the public, and is conducted as an “open house” — visitors may arrive and depart at any time during the event’s hours. The CAA’s observatory will be open and association members also will be on hand to share views through their personal telescopes.

An interesting activity any time of year is to make note of the daily changes we see in the phases of Moon. Open the PDF to print a handy guide and journal for lunar observation: Moon Observation Journal.

To find our observatory, and what to expect with a “star party,” visit the following: https://cuyastro.org/caa-observatory/

Public Night at Letha House Saturday, June 8

Photo: Waxing Crescent Moon, July 29, 2017. Photo by James Guilford.

Come see deep-sky objects, planets, and the Moon up close using the Cuyahoga Astronomical Association’s (CAA) telescopes, from 9:00 to 11:00 PM, Saturday, June 8.

The CAA Observatory will be open for public viewing, and members will be available to answer your questions. Activities and/or displays will be set up inside the barn for further interest on cloudy nights. Given clear enough skies, visitors may view Earth’s Moon, planet Jupiter, and star clusters through a variety of member-owned telescopes.

This is an outdoor program so attendees should dress appropriately for conditions; use of insect repellent is also recommended.

Click here for more information about the observatory and its location!

Monday, September 11: Monthly Membership Meeting

Image: Artist's concept of Cassini spacecraft at Saturn. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
In this still from the short film Cassini’s Grand Finale, the spacecraft is shown diving between Saturn and the planet’s innermost ring. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The Cuyahoga Astronomical Association (CAA) will host its monthly meeting at 7:30 PM, Monday, September 11 in the Cleveland Metroparks’ Rocky River Nature Center, North Olmsted. The speaker will be Jay Reynolds who will discuss NASA’s Cassini Mission to Saturn and its finale, set to occur September 15. The program is free and open to the public, no reservations required.

The Cassini spacecraft will make its final approach to the giant planet Saturn this Friday, ending an extremely productive seven-year mission. This encounter will be like no other. This time, Cassini will dive into the planet’s atmosphere, sending science data for as long as its small thrusters can keep the spacecraft’s antenna pointed at Earth. Soon after, Cassini will burn up and disintegrate like a meteor.

In addition to being a research astronomer who teaches at Cleveland State University, Reynolds is CAA’s observatory director. He frequently appears on Cleveland television, hosting a show about astronomy on WKYC, Channel 3.

Following the program, the club’s monthly membership meeting will convene.

July 29: A great night for stargazers

Photo: Astronomers with their telescopes. Photo by Alan Studt.
Under Starry Skies – Photo by Alan Studt

by William Murmann, CAA President

We had one of our most successful public star parties for the Medina County Park District last night (July 29) at Letha House. I don’t have an exact count, but I think 100 or more guests came for the event under great clear skies and mild temperatures. The parking lot was full. Lots of young families came with children, many of whom got their first look at the Moon, Jupiter, Saturn, and other objects through a telescope.

Photo: Waxing Crescent Moon, July 29, 2017. Photo by James Guilford.
Waxing Crescent Moon dominated the sky for the CAA’s Public Night. Photo by James Guilford.

Many thanks to all who helped! Observatory Director Jay Reynolds had a busy night showing the night sky with our 12-inch and 8-inch scopes. Education Director Nora Mishey spent the whole evening in the building, talking with folks about her educational astronomy displays, sharing home-baked cookies, and discussing our club. Three platters of Nora’s cookies quickly disappeared.

Photo: Woman using telescope in red-lit observatory under starry sky.
“First-light” observing with the just-completed eight-inch Meade. Photo by Alan Studt

 

 

 

 

We had 14 scopes at the event. Two of them were brought by nonmembers who hopefully will join our club. I was busy during the evening talking with people and showing the Moon with my scope, so I may not have a complete list of members who helped. If I missed anyone, please let me know.

Photo: Group pauses to watch a passage of the International Space Station. Photo by James Guilford.
Watching the Space Station. Photo by James Guilford.

A big thank you for helping to VP Tim Campbell, Bob Wiersma, James Guilford, Alan Studt, Rich & Nancy Whisler, Bill & Carol Lee, Carl Kudrna, Dave Nuti, Chris Christie, Bruce Lane, Jay Reynolds, Nora Mishey, and me. If you were there and I missed you, please let me know.

Thanks again everyone!

Saturday, May 27: Our First Public Night of the season!

The Cuyahoga Astronomical Association (CAA) will host our first public star party of the year for the Medina County Park District starting at 8 PM this coming Saturday, May 27. A program and the star party will take place at Letha House Park.

The public program will be a “Telescope Night” with the visitors invited to bring their personal telescopes to learn how to set up and use them starting at 8 PM.  After it gets dark, we’ll have the usual star gazing program between 9 and 11 PM.

Members: Any and all help will be appreciated!  Please bring a scope if you can and assist with the program.

CAA’s observatory is located at 5800-5994 Richman Road – Just North of Spencer Lake Road Spencer, OH 44275. Click here for a Google Map and instructions on how to get to the observatory.

Milky Way stars during public star party

Photo: Looking South Along the Lake at Letha House Park, Milky Way Glowing Overhead, the Moon Sinking Low in the West. Photo by Alan Studt.
Looking South Along the Lake at Letha House Park, Milky Way Glowing Overhead. Photo by Alan Studt. Nikon D810: ISO 3200, 13 sec., f/2.8, 14mm.

We had great sky conditions for our August 6 public star party at Letha House Park. We didn’t get an exact count, but I think there were between 75 and 100 guests who came for the program, including Park Ranger Bob who stopped by to say hello.

I had to make a quick count in the dark, but I think we had about 12 telescopes for this Medina County Park District program. Two telescopes were brought by new members who I believe joined one of our star parties for the first time.

Many thanks to Dave Nuti, Chris Christe, Bruce Lane, Jay Reynolds, Nora Mishey, Carl Kudrna, Rich & Nancy Whisler, Bob Wiersma, Alan Studt, Rob Seig, Bob & Mary Deep, and Gale Franko who joined me to help with the program!

Thanks to Jay, who manned the observatory and gave our new 12-inch go-to scope a workout to show the night sky to our numerous  guests.  And thanks also to Nora, who brought delicious homemade cookies and her astronomy Q & A display, and who served as a host in the building to help promote our club and the park district’s programs.

Reported by William Murmann, CAA President

Photo: Summer Milky Way. Photo by Alan Studt.
Summer Milky Way. Photo by Alan Studt. Nikon D810: ISO 5000, 15 sec., f/2.8, 14mm.

Public Observing Saturday, August 6

The Cuyahoga Astronomical Association’s (CAA’s) observatory at Letha House Park will be open for public observing Saturday, August 6, from 8:30 to 11:00 PM. Visitors will be treated to telescopic views of the Moon (early), Saturn, and as the sky darkens, deep sky objects such as star clusters. Mars may also be viewed but is becoming more distant from Earth and offers less detail to viewers. Click here for our observatory’s web page for information on how to get to the observatory and advice on attending a star party.

The observatory is operated in cooperation with the Medina County Park District (which owns the property). Restroom facilities are available at the park and, in the event of cloudy or inclement weather, an indoor astronomy program will be offered in place of outdoor observing.