“Beautiful” fireball seen, recorded

Photo: June 11, 2016 Meteor Track - Credit: NASA
June 11, 2016 – 10:17 PM EDT Fireball meteor captured by NASA’s All-Sky Fireball Network located at Hiram College. Credit: NASA

Kim Doran emailed us on June 12 asking if anyone had seen what she witnessed the night before: a brilliant, multi-colored fireball meteor. Fireballs are meteors that flare to become brighter than the planet Venus.

We don’t know if other human observers saw the meteor’s brilliant fall but NASA’s automated cameras on the campuses of Hiram College and Oberlin College recorded the June 11 event at 10:17 PM EDT.

“(I) saw what I thought was a very large shooting star … then brighter flash and very thick trail with quick red, bright white, and some blue.” She said she is 57 years of age and has never seen anything quite like this before. “Beautiful!”

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Fireball thrills observers

Published on Sep 28, 2013
Last night, a meteor exploded in the skies above the US midwest. Witnesses report shadows cast upon the ground, unusual sounds, and a swirling contrail marking the aftermath of the blast. A NASA all-sky camera in Hiram, Ohio, recorded the fireball at 11:33 pm EDT: 

”This was a very bright event,” reported Bill Cooke of NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office. “Flares saturated our meteor cameras, and made determination of the end point (the terminus of the fireball’s flight through the atmosphere) virtually impossible. Judging from the brightness, we are dealing with a meter-class object.”

Data from multiple cameras shows that the meteoroid hit Earth’s atmosphere traveling 51 km/s (114,000 mph) and passed almost directly over Columbus, Ohio. Cooke has prepared a preliminary map of the ground track. According to the American Meteor Society, the fireball was visible from at least 14 US states. The meteor is estimated to have exploded 41 miles directly above Columbus, Ohio.

Members of the CAA, at the club’s Letha House Park observing site near Spencer, Ohio, also saw the event. Observatory Director Jay Reynolds recounted the sight: “[Others] were observing in the parking lot, I was in the observatory reviewing photos I had taken when the observatory grew from darkness to BRIGHT in half a second! [It was] initially white, then green, then FLASH as if someone took a photo. As we looked, Capricorn now had a large glowing scar running 15-20 degrees horizontally across, running through it. The smoke trail was so bright, it too, may have been able to cast a shadow in the first second after it’s flashy birth, slowly fading, taking nearly a minute to disappear.”

Bright fireball thrills Northern Ohioans

WOW! Did you see that?
If you were walking the dog last night about 9:55, you may have seen the BRIGHT meteor in the skies over Northern Ohio! Observers report a bright streak with green and blue in it, suggesting the presence of iron in the space rock. While not unexpected, this time of year, we are able to see what as known as the June Lyrid Meteor shower (June 14-16). The June Lyrids usually don’t produce many sightings. Local reports range from Willoughby Hills, Bedford, Solon, Avon Lake, as far South as Youngstown. Mark Johnson, from {WEWS TV 5} reports sightings from Michigan and Toronto. — Jay Reynolds

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“Saw it very well here in Bay Village. Unlike any meteor I have seen. It was incredible.” –Trevor Braun